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Boots and feet coverings tutorial!-Part Two

stayinspired

Hands, feet and even shoes can be a challenge for me. So when I find a great tutorial that sheds some light on how others approach this I feel obligated to pass it along to our readers!

Here’s part two of the tutorial by RadenWa from DeviantArt on drawing boots. Great stuff!

Please note this tutorial is LONG! Below is just a small part of it. The rest of the image is after the jump!

Enjoy!

If you missed Part One you can find it here.

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Boots and feet coverings tutorial!-Part One

stayinspired

Hands, feet and even shoes can be a challenge for me. So when I find a great tutorial that sheds some light on how others approach this I feel obligated to pass it along to our readers!

So I ran across a two part tutorial by RadenWa from DeviantArt on drawing boots. Great stuff! Time for me to find an excuse to draw characters with boots on! Enjoy! I’ll be posting Part Two soon! (Yes, this just part one!)

wa__s_boot_anatomy_tutorial_pt1_by_radenwa-d3k8u2z

Fan Art and Commissions – Legal or No?

spreadyourwings

One of the many ways that Illustrators supplement their income is to do commissions. The word commission in and of itself can mean any work that you take on for a fee. In this specific instance though we are generally speaking of work that you take on from a client that is for personal and not commercial purposes. This means that the client is looking at the work more as something to add to their personal collection (put on their wall) rather than publishing or reproducing in a commercial or publicly available format.

Commissions of this nature generally cater more to the clients favorite characters, ideas or scenarios.  Someone may ask you to draw Superman fighting Capt. America or Bilbo fighting Link from Legend of Zelda. This type of work is very common within the comic book /convention industry. At comic conventions you will often see artists drawing their renditions of a fans requested favorite character for a fee. The problem that can arise from this is that when characters are asked for that the artist or fan don’t own the copyright or trademark to you can run into some shaky water.

NewAvengers_Digital_Inks_by_mtykwan
Image Pencils by SpiderGuile Inks by Wilson Williams, Jr.
all characters are owned by Marvel Entertainment

So if you are entertaining going into this aspect of illustration for additional income, I advise that you do your homework on the legalities of doing so. Even at conventions their is always the possibility of a being approached by the lawyer representing the copyright owner of a character you are selling. For your own safety approach every aspect of your work with as much knowledge as you possibly can.

As a starting point I ran across a great video that lays the groundwork for doing commissions and the legal and copyright issues that may arise. The video features Josh Wattles, a copyright expert and current professor and employee of DeviantArt. Enjoy his video where he goes over copyright and the implications it may bring.

Infographic on Why to Showcase Your Work On Online

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By now we should all know that to be successful in our industry you need to have an online presence. Freelance artists must promote their work in as many places as possible to gain exposure and attract as many clients as we can. This infographic made by the PrintRunner Blog shows statistics and sites that designers and illustrators can use to promote their portfolios.

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It was originally intended for designers but it is definitely applicable to illustrators’ work. They discuss using seven different sites to promote your work as well as statistics for each site. I have used most of these but a few I haven’t tried yet. The sites are Carbonmade.com, behance.net, coroflot.com, dripbook.com, viewbook.com, deviantart.com, and krop.com.

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The infographic discusses statistics for each site and the advantages of paying for each service. Most offer a free version but a few do not. It also talks about the pros and cons of each site, whether it offers mobile support and the site’s community size. It also has a few best practices when showing your portfolio online. Here is the full infographic. Take a look at the graphic and decide which service you would like to use to promote your work.